Steamboat

We were joined by our niece who was visiting us from Ireland this weekend. To celebrate, my wife decided to cook traditional Chinese steamboat, and it was fortunate that our niece had been craving this as well.

First, the raw ingredients which will be cooked in the soup in the steamboat. As with all forms of cooking where you deal with raw meat, it is important to take precautions not to use utensils used in handling the raw meats when serving the cooked meat.

Extra-large King prawns
Extra-large King prawns
Various types of fish balls
Various types of fish balls
Fish and strips of scored squid
Fish and strips of scored squid
Beef and lamb strips
Beef and lamb strips
Some smaller raw prawns
Some smaller raw prawns
Various vegetables
Various vegetables

These are then placed into the electric steamboat and the heat is switched on so the soup is brought to boil, which then cooks the meat in it. This is left to cook until all the different meats are cooked (especially important when cooking chicken). And the best thing is that the soup will get richer and taste even better with each batch of cooking – some even say that the soup is the best bit in the steamboat.

The electric steamboat filled with soup and a variety of food
The electric steamboat filled with soup and a variety of food
Vegetables and strips of beef to top it all off
Vegetables and strips of beef to top it all off
Birds-eye view of all the food
Birds-eye view of all the ingredients, there is even a little bit of Ghost chilli in there

Once the food is cooked, it can be served (or taken out of the steamboat) – each can choose what they would like to eat. And here are the pictures of the cooked prawns. As you can see it is very large (especially if you know how large a fish ball is).

Cooked King prawn (next to a fish-ball)
Cooked King prawn (next to a fish-ball)
A few of the cooked extra large king prawns
A few of the cooked extra large king prawns

And to go with all the seafood, what better wine than a bottle of 11 year old Australian Semillon to wash it all down with. When young, Semillon looks much lighter yellow and has a more citrusy aroma and taste, whereas more mature Semillon tends to take on a golden colour and have aromas of honey and nuts and also often of butter.

Tim Adams Semillon 2004 to go with the seafood
Tim Adams Semillon 2004 to go with the seafood
Honey-coloured aged Semillon
Honey-coloured aged Semillon

All in all, a very nice meal. But my youngest daughter did ask – why are we eating so much food (as she was feeling very full)? Clearly this meal does not reflect the amount we normally eat. Suffice it to say that there was a lot of leftovers – evidence that my wife has done the shopping for food.

Boon