Sous vide: duck breast

One of the other dishes I do cook regularly is Sous vide duck breasts. To prepare the duck breasts, I tend to score the skin first which aids the fat to melt into oil – leaving nice crispy skin with minimal fat. I use honey to coat the skin prior to vacuum sealing it.

I tend to cook this in the water bath at 56 degrees celcius for 2 hours. This allows it to be cooked sufficiently to the right degree, so the meat remains tender and juicy.

Gressingham duck breasts
Gressingham duck breasts
The skin is scored through and coated with honey
The skin is scored through and coated with honey
Vacuum sealed prior to cooking in water bath
This is then vacuum sealed prior to cooking in water bath

After cooking in the water bath, the duck breasts are taken out and dried with kitchen towel and allowed to rest. The next step is to sprinkle some salt on the duck breasts at this stage. They are then placed skin-side down into a hot fry pan, to allow the fat to melt and the skin to crisp up. The meat side only needs about 10-15 seconds to brown it though.

Duck breasts placed on to hot fry pan without any oil - the fat will start to liquify
Duck breasts placed on to hot fry pan without any oil – the fat will start to liquify
The skin is cooked until dark brown and crispy, the meat only needs a short time to brown it
The skin is cooked until dark brown and crispy, the meat only needs a short time to brown it. The oil in the fry pan is from the fat.

The end result is duck breasts with tender meat, crispy skin with little fat remaining. This needs to rest for a few minutes before cutting. Then it is ready for plating.

The duck breasts are allowed to rest for a few minutes before cutting
The duck breasts are allowed to rest for a few minutes before cutting
The final product - served with cucumber slices and tomatoes
The final product – served with cucumber slices and tomatoes
The duck breast plated up
The duck breast plated up

Boon