Sony A7II – impressions

As I mentioned yesterday, I had the opportunity to play with my friend’s Sony A7II at a church celebration. I thought I would share my thoughts on the Sony A7II from the perspective of someone who owns the Sony A7R and A6000.

Here are some shots of the Sony A7II.

Sony A7II with 28-70mm lens
Sony A7II with 28-70mm lens
Feels very comfortable in the hand
Feels very comfortable in the hand

What stands out about the Sony A7II?

1) The grip is much more substantial and feels stable when holding the camera – the first-generation Sony A7 series cameras probably should have been designed like this.

The more substantial grip
The more substantial grip

2) The body is definitely thicker (by a few mm) than the Sony A7R, due to the in-body image stabiliser.

Sony A7R on right and A7II on left
Sony A7R on right and A7II on left – thickness difference definitely visible

3) The weight is definitely heavier than the Sony A7R, but it is still light compared to a DSLR.

4) The shutter button is better placed than on the A7R. It is very differently placed, so A7R users may need some time to get used to it – my index finger did wander to the wrong place on the A7II on a few occasions (as I am accustomed to the A7R layout).

The shutter button is situated where it should be - on top of the grip
The shutter button is now situated where it should have been in the earlier A7 cameras – on top of the grip

5) The zooming in and out of the image when reviewing a photo, is done by rotating the back circular dial clockwise or anticlockwise which is so much better (just like in the Sony A6000); the A7R uses the top rear dial to scroll in and out which can require many turns and is not very user-friendly – this is probably one thing I hope Sony would improve through the firmware.

Back dial of the Sony A7II is used to zoom in and out of image during playback
Back circular dial of the Sony A7II is used to zoom in and out of image during playback

6) The shutter sound is so much softer and less intrusive than that of the Sony A7R. The fact it has electronic first curtain shutter which reduces the sound to just one (more refined) click also helps.

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