Solar images from 31/10/15

Since the purchase of the Daystar Quark, I have been looking for an opportunity to do more solar imaging. The opportunity came in the early afternoon of Saturday 31/10/15 as the skies cleared and the sun was fairly high in the sky. So out came my equipment while the Daystar Quark was warming up to get it on band (I’ve already worked out that for me this was 2 clicks turn clockwise).

Now what I had found was that there are Newtonian rings visible with my Celestron Neximage 5 camera, but this is not present with my full-spectrum Olympus E-PL5 (without an ICF). The images below were taken with the E-PL5.

First three images are single shots processed with Capture One Pro 8.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Sunspot AR2443 with the prominence visible
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Sunspot AR2443 with the prominence visible
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Image exposed for the sunspot

Next are images made from the video capture at full HD, converted to AVI using PIPP, stacked in AutoStakkert! 2 and then wavelets from Registax used to process the images. I have to say that the images are not as good as I would have hoped for, but I am still learning the ins and outs of H-alpha imaging.

PA310004_pipp_g3_b3_ap59
Sunspot AR2443 with the visible prominence and spicules
PA310021_pipp_g3_b3_ap75
Another image of Sunspot AR2443 with the visible prominence
PA310072_pipp_g3_b3_ap51
Exposed to bring out the prominence
PA310171_pipp_g4_b3_ap218stax 1
Sunspot AR2443 with the visible prominence

I would have to say that the E-PL5 acquits itself very well for solar imaging, particularly the video capture. Hopefully I will have more opportunities to perfect the h-alpha imaging of the sun. The Daystar Quark certainly works very well, and I even had a good time doing some visual observation of the sun with it.

Boon