Oregon Scientific BAR228 Bluetooth Temperature and Humidity Sensor

With my obsy now complete with my telescope set up inside and the dehumidifier running to control the humidity especially after a night of imaging, I realised that I wanted an easily accessible form of continuous of the temperature and humidity in my observatory, something my current sensor cannot do. After research, I decided to buy the Oregon Scientific BAR228 Bluetooth temperature and humidity sensor for £39.99 from Amazon.

The Oregon Weather+ Bluetooth sensor is small and unintrusive, so can be placed in different rooms without looking out of place. I have mounted mine on the wall of my observatory, as that means it will not get knocked over when I am doing stuff in my Obsy. This way, I can monitor the conditions in there 24 hours a day all year round – and have the temperature and humidity curves detailing the readings throughout the year in there.

Oregon BAR 288 Bluetooth temperature and humidity sensor
Oregon BAR 288 Bluetooth temperature and humidity sensor
Comes with the sensor, instructions and 2 x AAA batteries
Comes with the sensor, instructions and 2 x AAA batteries
With cover on
With cover on

It comes pretty much ready for use – you just need to put in the 2 included 2 x AAA alkaline batteries, download the App, follow the instructions and you are ready to start using it.

Front with cover off - battery compartment
Front with cover off – battery compartment
Rear with mounting screw slot
Rear with mounting screw slot

The free App is easy to manoeuvre around and can be customised to suit the user.

Weather+ App from Oregon Scientific
Weather+ App from Oregon Scientific

It even prompts you on how to get the sensor paired up via Bluetooth with the App. Mine paired fine without any problems.

Initial screen from App
Initial screen from App

I selected one of the photos in my Camera Roll for my Obsy, rather than one of their default room photos. I used Customize room as there is no option for an observatory amongst their defaults – the closest available from their list of defaults would have been a Greenhouse. There is even the option of Wine Cellar in there, for those who collect wine and would like to know and monitor the exact temperature and humidity where they store their wine.

Choice of different rooms for sensor and pick of photo for that room
Choice of different rooms for sensor and you can choose a photo for that room

Now for the most interesting bit, the History section, where you can choose to view the Temperature, Humidity or Pressure for the day, week, month or year. As you can see from the information below, it says a lot about my observatory, and what I may be doing. The maximum temperature recorded on 3/5/16 was 21.4 degrees Celsius and minimum 4.3 degrees Celsius, and a maximum humidity of 82% and minimum of 45%.

The high readings can be attributed to me being in the observatory with the door open while I was fiddling about with the equipment, and also tells when I closed up to do something else as the temperature started to fall shortly after. The low readings were when the roof was off and I was trying to do some imaging; you can see the temperature and humidity changing just after Midnight, which meant that I had closed up the Obsy for the night.

So from these recordings, I can actually recall what and when I was doing something in the Obsy, almost like playing detective work like Sherlock Holmes.

Temperature curve
Temperature curve
Humidity curve
Humidity curve

What do I like about this sensor?

  1. It allows for the continuous monitoring (every 15 mins, 30 mins, 1 hr, 3 hrs or less frequently up to every 2 days) of the temperature, humidity and pressure of the room the sensor is placed in.
  2. Has memory to store up to 20 days of data.
  3. Syncs with the iPhone or tablet for simple at your fingertips analysis of the data.
  4. It has temperature, humidity and pressure alerts, which can be set to notify you if the readings exceed the maximum/minimum settings you’ve chosen. But this depends on there being a Bluetooth connection to your device.
  5. Allows for multiple sensors to be connected to one device if monitoring more than 1 room e.g. baby’s bedroom, wine cellar.

What could be improved?

  1. There is a ‘customize’ room for that room which does not have an exact fit, but this does not allow you to rename it.
  2. At ¬£39.99 it isn’t exactly cheap.
  3. There needs to be a Bluetooth connection with the sensor in order to download the data, so there are some rooms in my house where this may not be possible owing to the number of walls in the way. But in general I can connect to it from the living, dining and bedroom.

Overall, I do think this is a great sensor for monitoring conditions in rooms where temperature and/or humidity can be important. I for one would like to know how hot my obsy will get during Summer, as I may need to increase the protection from the Sun if it does get too hot in there.

Verdict: I like it. Recommended.

Boon