My Obsy update

Previously I posted about my observatory, but there were still a few things outstanding which I needed to get done before I could say that it was finished. Now that these issues have been addressed, I can now post an update on my obsy.

These are the issues I had previously raised.

  1. Heat issue:

I was concerned that there would be an excessive build up of heat during summer. I had considered the various options available and decided that the simplest way to deflect most of the heat would be with solar reflective paint, bought from Amazon. The claim is that this paint will reflect 90% of the heat, while letting in 80% of the light – which would be useful for a greenhouse.I don’t mind about the light, as the inside of the obsy is completely insulated and sealed.

500ml tin of solar reflective paint (covers 50-60 sq feet)
500ml tin of solar reflective paint (covers 50-60 sq feet)

As the sun was shining brightly on Sunday (17/4/16), I decided to take full advantage of the conditions and paint the roof. It took about 1 1/2 hour to complete but I am pleased with the results. Hopefully it will withstand the weather. And although the day was warm, the obsy did not feel overly warm. First impressions is that there is a definite improvement with this paint applied.

Solar reflective paint covering the polycarbonate roof
Solar reflective paint covering the polycarbonate roof
Solar reflective paint applied to the other side of the roof
Solar reflective paint applied to the other side of the roof

2. Mounting of telescope:

I was starting to have doubts that my 12″ Newtonian would be too big to fit in the obsy. But with all the insulation and heat-deflection in place, it was now the moment of truth: time to mount my telescope in there. As expected, I did not need to worry as the telescope was able to swivel about fairly freely without hitting the walls unless pointing too low down.

12" Newtonian mounted in with both sides of roof opened up
12″ Newtonian mounted in with both sides of roof opened up
Closer look at the telescope
Closer look at the telescope

Now the question is whether I will be able to ‘Park’ the telescope in a certain position – set as the Home position – so that I can close the roof. This would then allow me to use the Hibernate function to power down the mount but still retain the alignment – and hence no need to redo star alignment each time I restart the mount. In the position below, I am able to do all this. Great!

Likely to be my 'Park' position before closing up the obsy
Likely to be my Home  position before closing up the obsy

Next is the cover to protect my telescope from dust. I chose to use a bike cover as it is fairly light but large enough to cover both the telescope and the mount.

Bike cover on my telescope
Bike cover on my telescope

I have also lengthened the chains holding the right side of the roof which was a little too high and blocking some of the sky. Now it is allowing me to access more of the North-West sky. Next is to wait for clear skies (without the moon) to do some deep sky imaging.

Boon