Laser Bond – UV activated liquid plastic

Recently I saw the advert for the Lazer Bond UV activated liquid plastic adhesive and filler. It is interesting that it is supposed to set fairly quickly following the exposure to UV alight (supplied). Hence I had to buy one to try, especially as it costs a reasonable £9.99.

Now the big questions I had were:

1) Does it really work?

2) Does it actually set clear or does it change following exposure to the UV?

3) Does it really only take 3 to 8 seconds of exposure to UV for the plastic to set?

Lazer bond pen with UV light
Lazer bond pen with UV light
Works with many different materials
Works with many different materials
Handy little pen device
Handy little pen device

Now I did not have anything I could use this on until recently when I dropped my white fountain pen on the floor and cracked part of the body of the pen. This was the perfect chance to test it out. But as I am interested in UV-imaging, I thought I had to photograph this in UV.

First is the photo of the pen with the cracks on the body.

Cracks on the pen - UV (365nm)
Cracks on the pen – UV (365nm)

The Lazer bond plastic resin looks dark in UV light.

After Lazer bond applied - UV (365nm)
After Lazer bond applied – UV (365nm)

This is what it looks like with the UV light supplied with the Lazer bond.

The supplied UV torch - likely 385-390nm torch
The supplied UV torch – likely 385-390nm torch

So it does look like it sets clear – see image below.

Lazer bond set - visible light
Lazer bond set – visible light

But it clearly looks very different in UV light – image below is when the liquid plastic has set.

Lazer bond set - UV (365nm)
Lazer bond set – UV (365nm)

I am pretty impressed with the Lazer bond, as it does set well and has filled the crack on my fountain pen. At that price, it is definitely recommended. We just need to be careful with both the pen and the UV torch, to prevent contact with the skin and especially the eyes.

Verdict:

Recommended, but use with care.

Boon