Gin and Tonic – with a twist

Gin and tonic is a popular drink in England, and is often a beverage people look forward to at the end of a long day. Here I would like to show what I feel is the best gin and tonic (and my wife does agree too), but I have also added a little twist to it – and no it has nothing to do with the slice of lemon in it. Read on to find out more.

There are many different brands of gin out there, but none of them can compare with Martin Miller Gin. It is a multi-award winning premium gin, made from 10 carefully selected botanicals. It is distilled in England and then flown to Iceland where it is blended with pure Icelandic water to reach its bottling strength of 40%.

The process through which it is made and the fragrant aromas which it gives off, all indicate that it is in a league of its own; much better than any other gin we have tasted. Our friend Janet would agree, as does her friend who is a Professor in London.

Martin Miller Gin and its glass
Martin Miller Gin and its glass

Now to produce the best gin and tonic, one has to partner it with the Fever Tree Tonic water, which is much better than the Schweppes Indian Tonic Water. To some ice cubes and a slice of lemon, you add in the gin followed by the tonic. I prefer 1 part gin to 4 parts tonic, as it gives the aromas of the gin but not the bitterness associated with it; some may like more gin instead.

Fever Tree tonic water
Fever Tree Premium Indian tonic water
Ice and a slice of lemon
Ice and a slice of lemon
Gin and tonic in a glass
Gin and tonic in a glass
My gin and tonic (much more tonic than gin)
My gin and tonic (much more tonic than gin)

┬áNow for the twist I promised. I was watching Tron Legacy on Amazon Prime Video recently, and in one scene Sam Flynn the son is having a meal with his father. They were drinking a fluorescent liquid. And that got me thinking – what would gin and tonic look like in UV-induced visible fluorescence (UVIVF)? Well, here is the answer.

UV-induced fluorescence of gin and tonic
UV-induced fluorescence of gin and tonic
UV-induced fluorescence of gin and tonic
UV-induced fluorescence of gin and tonic

I used my Nichia 365nm UV torch to light up the drink. In fact there was enough light to shoot at 1/40 secs ISO 200 F2.8. I am sure this does not enhance or detract from the immense flavours of the gin and tonic, but it certainly looked very nice indeed. And at least now we all know what gin and tonic looks like in UVIVF.

Boon