Fly meets JML 20x objective and Aico 35mm F3.5 enlarging lens

Previously I had photographed the house fly using the Leica Focotar-II 50mm F4.5 lens. But I thought I would try and capture the housefly at even higher magnification. To do this, I enlisted the help of the JML 20x microscope objective and the Aico 35mm F3.5 enlarging lens. I used my Sony A6000, macro bellows and Stackshot to capture the images for stacking in Helicon Focus.

Aico 35mm F3.5 Enlarging lens:

I do like the 35mm F3.5 enlarging lens as it is very compact, sharp, have very good UV-transmission capabilities (which I have posted on my website here) and is a very good macro lens. The shorter focal length means that I can image at even higher magnification than I could with the Leica Focotar-II. The lens was mounted 29.2cm away from the sensor, which equates to 8x magnification (or 12x if you factor in the 1.5x crop factor of the Sony A6000).

Fly - Aico 35mm F3.5 lens @ F4 (stack of 40 images)
Fly – Aico 35mm F3.5 lens @ F4 (stack of 40 images)
100% crop
100% crop

JML 20x Microscope Objective:

Using the JML 20x microscope objective, any slightest vibration is magnified many times. Hence I had to use longer settle times and I also left the room so as not to impart any vibrations accidentally. The depth of field is extremely shallow and hence I had to use 10 micron steps to ensure there is sufficient overlap for stacking.

Fly eye - JML 20x microscope objective (stack of 40 images - in 10 microns steps)
Fly eye – JML 20x microscope objective (stack of 40 images – in 10 microns steps)
100% crop
100% crop

These two lenses are able to capture subjects at high magnification which other lenses are unable to match. Hence they do have a place amongst my arsenal of lenses. Fortunately I do have quite a collection of the 35mm F3.5 enlarging lens as backup. I do need to look for a JML 20x microscope objective though.

Boon