EcoAir DD122FW-MK5 Desiccant Dehumidifier

With the decision to build an observatory to house my telescope and aid my astroimaging aspirations, I decided that I did need a dehumidifier to help protect my equipment from excess humidity. Having searched the internet, I finally decided to buy the EcoAir DD122FW-MK5, as it is a highly rated dehumidifier which is also happens to be a top seller on Amazon.Now initially I paid £169.96 for the dehumidifier from Amazon, but two weeks down the line I noticed they had this on limited offer for £42.37 cheaper. I contacted Amazon, as I had not opened the box to see what they could do for me. Now although it was past the 7 days when Amazon would refund the difference, they did on this occasion refund me the difference. Otherwise I would have had to return the unopened item and reorder it from them.

Now the item came via next day delivery via Amazon Prime. It was about a month later before I unboxed it.

EcoAir dehumidifier
EcoAir dehumidifier

It isn’t very large or heavy but being a desiccant dehumidifier, it will continue to work down to 1 degree celsius. Hence will work in an unheated garage or shed or observatory. It comes with an ioniser and silver filter, and is capable of removing up to 7 litres of moisture per day.

It has EcoAir’s E7 technology to optimise performance while maximising energy savings. So when the correct humidity is achieved, the unit will stop dehumidifying, but the fan will continue to function (albeit at a much lower power consumption).

Louvres on the dehumidifier can direct the dry air in different directions
3D Louvre on the dehumidifier can direct the dry air in different directions
Control panel with different options
Control panel with different options – I set mine on Auto so it will regulate the humidity accordingly and save energy

There is a port which will allow for continuous drainage of water from the unit. I have yet to pipe this in, but will do so if the need arises. That way I would not need to worry about the dehumidifier stopping because it is full to the brim with water (the water tank has 2L capacity).

Air filter which can be cleaned
Air filter which can be cleaned
Now residing in my observatory to keep the air dry
Now residing in my observatory to keep the air dry

I have left an Oregon thermometer-hygrometer inside my observatory to monitor the temperature and humidity in there. Prior to the use of the dehumidifier, there used to be condensation on the telescope pier and the humidity was in the 80+%. Now with the dehumidifier in use and removing humidity, it has come down to a much better 50+%.

Thermometer and humidistat to monitor the conditions in the observatory
Thermometer and humidistat to monitor the conditions in the observatory

I have to say that so far it seems to be working fine and bringing the humidity down rather well, even at cooler temperatures. It won’t be long now before I can mount my telescope in my observatory and no longer need to carry it back into the house after a night of imaging. Great. So barring any problems down the line, I would recommend this dehumidifier currently.

(Update: I have used this dehumidifier for a few weeks now and it seems to be doing the work well and keeping humidity down in my observatory. I have even reset the Oregon thermo-hygro sensor to wirelessly link with my home unit so I can keep an eye on this. I think this will suffice for now, even though Oregon Scientific do have models which allow for iPhone connection with the base unit to monitor the readings and give 7-day summaries).

Top reading is humidity and temperature in my obsy - 50% and 10 degrees C. Below is of my bedroom.
Top reading is humidity and temperature in my obsy – 50% and 10 degrees C. Below is of my bedroom.

Now I will not only be able to see what the current readings are in my obsy, but it will also give me a maximum and minimum reading for both. Great!

Boon