Astronomik Deep-Sky RGB filters

Happy Valentine’s day to one and all. Rather than flowers, how about some more filters. Now I have thought about it, there seem to be a few things I like to buy/collect – photography adapter/stepping rings, imaging optics, cameras/imagers and imaging filters; they all help the progress along my photo journey.

Now while researching the Astronomik site for information about the narrowband filters, I came across a new set of filters developed by Astronomik for deep sky imaging, unimaginatively┬ácalled Deep-Sky RGB filters – but at least we know what they were designed for. As they had a great offer for the new filter set ending 31st January 2016, I felt I had to grasp the opportunity to buy it before the price went up. The main drawing point for these filters is that the filters are supposed to have been designed to work well with vast majority of current imaging sensors, including those from Sony, and allow for 1:1:1 exposures for a balanced colour image.

Now I had to order the filter set from Astronomik directly as it does not appear to be available in the UK currently. It was sent via German post and took about a week to arrive. First looks at the filter suggests that they look very similar to the LRGB filters.

New Astronomik Deep Sky RGB Filters
New Astronomik Deep Sky RGB Filters

The transmission curves for this filter set provided by Astronomik look promising, especially as there is a gap between the green and red which should block the light pollution from the Sodium vapour street lights which emit light centered around 589nm. The curves do have very steep shoulders, unlike previous RGB filters.

Transmission curves for the Deep-Sky RGB filters - there is a gap which hopefully will block some of the light pollution
Transmission curves for the Deep-Sky RGB filters – there is a gap which hopefully will block some of the light pollution

Now Astronomik did include a free postcard of the Horsehead nebula with my filter set, although I do not think that the image was actually taken with the Deep-Sky RGB filter set.

Horsehead nebula postcard
Horsehead nebula postcard
Back of Postcard
Back of Postcard

Now as I live in a light polluted area, rather than a normal luminance filter I had to consider getting one which blocked light pollution effectively. Astronomik do claim that their CLS-CCD filter will match the Deep-Sky RGB filters very well, and as this filter has worked well for me for astroimaging, I’ve also bought the CLS-CCD in 1.25″ to install into the filter wheel. I will likely use this for the luminance channel for my narrowband imaging as well.

Astronomik CLS-CCD filter
Astronomik CLS-CCD filter

Now the waiting begins for the skies to clear. Then we shall see how well this filter set performs.

Boon